Deliverables

Reviewed by Anjaneyulu | Updated on Aug 27, 2020

Introduction

A deliverable is a tangible or intangible product or service created as a result of a project which is intended to be delivered to an internal or external client. A report, a paper, a software product, a system update, or some other building block of an overall project may be a deliverable. Many smaller deliverables can be a part of one deliverable. This approach can either be a result to reach or an output to produce.

Understanding

Some deliverables rely on other outputs being achieved first; this is typical in multiple successive milestone projects. The incremental deliverables approach makes it time-efficient, significantly shortening the entire final delivery period of the project.

This design activity can be represented in drawings with a "cloud" around a part that has not yet been designed meaning: "this part (size or other characteristics) will be studied later. The settled portion can be "delivered" to stakeholders.

A deliverable varies from a project milestone in that a milestone is a measure of progress towards a goal. In contrast, the deliverable is the product provided to a customer or supporter. Deliverables can additionally be categorised as hardware, software, or design documents in technical projects.

In contractual endeavours, deliverable can refer to an item required explicitly by contract documents, such as an item on a list of contract data requirements or mentioned in the work statement.

Types

Deliverables are generally categorised as internal yields and external yields.

Internal Deliverables: Internal deliverables are typically deliverables that make a project work, but they aren't part of the product that end-users want. They are deliverables which are produced internally by the project. Some examples of internal deliverables are configuration management, project management, training, and testing.

External Deliverables: External deliverables are usually the ones provided to customers or clients by the project. An external deliverable may be an IT system and subsystems that make up the process or the subsequent organisational change and gain from a project to minimise a process turnaround time.