Forensic Accounting

Reviewed by Vineeth | Updated on Aug 27, 2020

Introduction

Forensic accounting will make use of auditing, accounting and investigative skills and knowledge to asses and examines the finances belonging to an individual or company. Forensic accounting offers an accounting overview which is apt to be used in proceedings associated with legal terms. The forensic accountants are trained in thinking out of the box and dealing with business entities on a real-time basis. Forensic accounting is typically utilised in fraud detection and embezzlement instances in order to break down the nature of the monetary crime in the court proceedings.

Breaking Down Forensic Accounting

Forensic accounting involves analysis and interpretation to summarise very complex business and fiscal details. Forensic accountants are generally hired by insurers, police departments, government wings, public accounting agencies, and banks. The work of these accountants will involve compiling fiscal proof, developing software to handle the information pooled and communicating their analysis in the form of presentations or reports.

Apart from proving in court, forensic accountants can also be tasked with preparing visual supports to aid trial findings. For investigations pertaining to businesses, forensic accounting involves tracing the source of funds, identification of assets, and recovering assets and reviewing.

Litigation

The advancements of forensic accounting are also made use of in resolving litigations when there is a need to quantify damages of a certain kind. In this case, the parties involved in the legal dispute may use the quantifications to support them in resolving the dispute by an out of court settlement. In some cases, a court hearing may be needed. For instance, disputes involving compensation and benefits sometimes require a court hearing. The forensic accountants can be employed to gauge the situation if the dispute reaches a level where court proceedings deem necessary.