Web 2.0

Reviewed by Anjaneyulu | Updated on Sep 30, 2020

Introduction

Web 2.0 characterises the worldwide web's second generation, where static HTML pages got transformed into a more interactive and fluid user interface. Web 2.0 focuses on people's ability to communicate and exchange information online through social media, blogging, and internet-based communities.

Web 2.0 represented a transition in which the worldwide web became an interactive environment between consumers and Web publishers, rather than the prior one-way conversation. It also reflects a more democratic version of the site, where new technologies allowed almost everyone to contribute irrespective of their technological expertise. Web 2.0 is pronounced as web-two-point-o.

Impact and Use

Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and JavaScript are used as productive web technologies for providing Web 2.0 in addition to Ajax, RSS, and Eclipse.

The implementations are based on the reorganised download approach that made BitTorrent famous. Every file downloader is also considered a server, sharing the workload and making it more open to users.

For an organisation, it can be a strong lure with interactivity promising to bring more workers into regular interaction at a lower cost. The use of Web 2.0 technology and software helps increase project participation and sharing of ideas, hopefully leading to better design thinking and more efficient production, strengthening bonds with customers and improving communications with partners.

Advantages

  • Available at any time, any place
  • Variety of media
  • Ease of usage
  • User-friendly
  • Can create dynamic learning communities
  • Provides real-time discussion
  • Active involvement of learners in knowledge building
  • Everybody is an author and editor
  • Updates in the wiki are immediate, and it offers more sources for researchers

Examples

Examples of Web 2.0 include navigation services (Google Maps), web apps (Google Docs, Flickr), wikis (MediaWiki), blogs (WordPress), video sharing sites (YouTube), folksonomies (Delicious), microblogging (Twitter), social networking (Facebook), podcasting (Podcast Alley), and navigation services for content and more.

So the big difference between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is that the websites built using the latter allows users to create, upload, and collaborate work and interact with others without any web design or publishing skills. In the world of Web 1.0, these capabilities were not present.

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